Role profile: survey manager

Survey managers are responsible for the technical running of surveys to collect data. They manage survey projects from beginning to end and understand how to design optimal surveys to meet requirements. They manage internal and external stakeholders at all levels and act as the main contact for survey projects.

Typical role responsibilities

Survey managers:

  • lead the day to day running of survey management tasks and management of survey projects
  • take ownership of the survey lifecycle – this includes things like scoping, costing, and project management
  • develop optimal surveys – this includes understanding user requirements to develop and adapt surveys using survey design techniques
  • ensure surveys produce data that is fit for purpose – this is in line with standards such as the Aqua Book and the Government Statistician Group (GSG) framework
  • maintain and manage relationships with internal and external stakeholders
  • manipulate, disseminate and present data using appropriate tools

In more senior roles, survey managers may lead a team.

Typically survey managers hold a degree or significant relevant experience from a quantitative subject. They are often members of the GSG or Government Social Research (GSR) profession.

Skills

There are several important skills that survey managers need to be successful in their role.

You must be able to demonstrate that you understand how to design optimal surveys to meet requirements.

You will be expected to demonstrate these skills at different levels depending on the seniority of your role.

Associate survey manager

As an associate survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Survey manager

As a survey manager, you must have a ‘working’ skill level.

Senior survey manager

As a senior survey manager, you must have an ‘expert’ skill level.

Lead survey manager

As a lead survey manager, you must have an ‘expert’ skill level.

You must be able to demonstrate that you understand survey management and methodologies.

You will be expected to demonstrate these skills at different levels depending on the seniority of your role.

Associate survey manager

As an associate survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Survey manager

As a survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Senior survey manager

As a senior survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

Lead survey manager

As a lead survey manager, you must have an ‘expert’ skill level.

You must be able to identify the main issues from data or information. You must also be able to present and share these insights as needed.

You will be expected to demonstrate these skills at different levels depending on the seniority of your role.

Associate survey manager

As an associate survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Survey manager

As a survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

Senior survey manager

As a senior survey manager, you must have an ‘expert’ skill level.

Lead survey manager

As a lead survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

You must be able to demonstrate knowledge of statistical methodologies.

You will be expected to demonstrate these skills at different levels depending on the seniority of your role.

Associate survey manager

As an associate survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Survey manager

As a survey manager, you must have a ‘working’ skill level.

Senior survey manager

As a senior survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

Lead survey manager

As a lead survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

You must have strong verbal and written communication skills. These skills will enable you to share insights with stakeholders.

You will be expected to demonstrate these skills at different levels depending on the seniority of your role.

Associate survey manager

As an associate survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Survey manager

As a survey manager, you must have a ‘working’ skill level.

Senior survey manager

As a senior survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

Lead survey manager

As a lead survey manager, you must have an ‘expert’ skill level.

You must be able to work with stakeholders to gather requirements and produce surveys.

You will be expected to demonstrate these skills at different levels depending on the seniority of your role.

Associate survey manager

As an associate survey manager, you must have an ‘awareness’ skill level.

Survey manager

As a survey manager, you must have a ‘working’ skill level.

Senior survey manager

As a senior survey manager, you must have a ‘practitioner’ skill level.

Lead survey manager

As a lead survey manager, you must have an ‘expert’ skill level.

Sample career path

The survey manager career path shows some of the common entry and exit points for the role. It also shows the typical skill levels needed.

You can enter a survey manager role from another analytical profession, or from other professions. You can also exit the role to join another profession.

The diagram shows a potential career path. It shows that you can enter or leave a role from a wide range of backgrounds and experience levels. For example, you could become a survey manager by developing your skills in an associate role. You could continue to move up the levels in the career path by taking on more senior survey manager roles. Or you could develop your skills by working in a technical specialist role in an analytical or digital profession. You could also develop the necessary skills by working in a profession agnostic role outside of these professions.

A role that could be done by any person with the relevant skills or experience from any profession.

This could be a ‘badged’ or professional role that is subject to entry requirements and development.

Beyond the lead survey manager role, you could go into more senior leadership roles. These roles require broader analytical understanding, and the ability to lead multi-disciplinary teams.